Jump to content
ginger

Diesel or Electric?

Recommended Posts

So I really need to purchase a new used vehicle. With the cost of fuel going up. as it stands I'm already in the hole for app $2,500. Any preference, ideas, warnings welcomed.

I just don't see how an electric vehicle can be practical in our area with all of the moisture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They have hybrid at Simmons-Rockwell, Ford C-Max, at decent price. MPG: 42 city / 38 highway. Hybrid just makes more sense than this all electric stampede.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my coworkers drives a Volkswagon Jetta diesel and says he gets over 700 miles to a fill up. I'm getting over 500 to a fill up on the Kia Optima I'm renting. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, ginger said:

One of my coworkers drives a Volkswagon Jetta diesel and says he gets over 700 miles to a fill up. I'm getting over 500 to a fill up on the Kia Optima I'm renting. 

How big is the tank in both vehicles?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think hybrid requires premium gas. Something to ponder. Some gas cars require premium also. I see the Mitsubishi Mirage is a

3 cyl. mpg 33/40 using regular gas. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are someone who puts a lot of miles on a vehicle, the problem with electric-only at this time is you need to plan your drives around charge stations, and plan on being there a while. With a gas/diesel vehicle I can pull up to a pump and get 400+ miles of range in about 5 minutes....10 tops. If I pull up to a charge station, what range will I get in that same 5-10 minutes? The answer is: It depends on the charger, the car, the current battery SOC, and the temperature. From what I have read, even on the top-of-the-heap Tesla SuperCharger you only get 50-80 miles in 10 minutes.....and that's the best case scenario. So the same 400 miles would take 50 minutes???? No thanks. And remember, that's at the fastest charger. A 'regular' charger that you are more likely to find along most routes will yield less range, and a 120v home charger will be even worse. The good news is that all this will change, but for now it's reality.

As for diesel, I don't think there are many cars offered with that powertrain. VW had a winner but had to 'cheat' the system to get there and were rewarded with the biggest car maker fine in history ($30B). Ironic that part of that settlement is being used to build the charger stations across the US. That leaves you with a choice of several pickup trucks, vans, a few SUVs, and 1 or 2 Jeep models. And don't forget that diesels command a premium. IMO gas is the way to go, at least for the next 5-8 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you put a lot of miles on your car (you do) electric is no good for you due to lack of recharging stations and the time necessary to recharge.  Diesel is too problematic in the cold weather and not too many economical cars are offered as diesels.  Your best bet would be a Toyota Rav4 Hybrid.  Uses regular gas, has high gas mileage and very reliable. With proper maintenance you should get 200K miles out of the vehicle.  Good luck with your choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for your help. I hadn't thought of any of those drawbacks.  I can't plan where/when I'm going to be...I'm always on call. Waiting for the car to charge doesn't sound practical either. Normal car it is! :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How Do Hybrid Electric Cars Work?

Hybrid electric vehicles are powered by an internal combustion engine and an electric motor, which uses energy stored in batteries. A hybrid electric vehicle cannot be plugged in to charge the battery. Instead, the battery is charged through regenerative braking and by the internal combustion engine. The extra power provided by the electric motor can potentially allow for a smaller engine. The battery can also power auxiliary loads and reduce engine idling when stopped. Together, these features result in better fuel economy without sacrificing performance.

The first obstacle anyone interested in buying a gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle will run up against is the higher cost of the hybrid powertrain versus its gasoline-only equivalent. Hybrid versions generally run several thousand dollars more than conventional versions of the same car.

https://afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/how-do-hybrid-electric-cars-work

You've narrowed it down to gas only and hybrid. As I posted, SImmons-Rockwell has a number of Ford C-Max hybrid available in the low teens to consider. No I don't have any connection to that business at all. Just fyi. Happy hunting.

https://www.simmons-rockwell.com/used-inventory/index.htm?search=c-Max&saveFacetState=true&compositeType=&lastFacetInteracted=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the link..that car definitely looks like a good bang for the buck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×